How much sleep does my baby/toddler/child need?

Alot of parents are unsure as to whether their baby/toddler/child is getting enough sleep. We all need sleep to function and it’s especially important for children as it directly impacts their mental and physical development. Below I have separated it into age groups with some tips.

 

BABIES – Observe baby’s sleep signs, put in crib when drowsy not asleep, keep room dark and quiet for nighttime sleep.

Newborn – 6 weeks : Daytime naps 5-6 hours ( divided into 3 naps) Night time sleep 10-12 hours (usually with 3 wakes)

6 weeks – 12 weeks : Daytime naps 3-4 hours ( divided into 3 naps) Night time sleep 11-12 hours ( usually with 2 wakes)

12 weeks – 6months: Daytime naps 3 hours ( divided into 2 naps) Night time sleep 11-12 hours ( usually with 1 wake up)

6-12 months: Daytime naps 2.5 hours ( divided into 2 sleeps) Night time sleep 12 hour ( no waking)

 

TODDLERS –Maintain a set bed time, keep consistent with communication, keep the bedroom quiet and safe, encourage a bedtime comfort for the child.

12 months – 18 months : Daytime nap 2 hours ( divided into one or 2 sleeps) Night time sleep 12 hour ( no waking

18 months – 2 years : Daytime nap 2 hours ( divided into one sleep, after lunch) Night time sleep 12hrs( no waking)

2 – 2.5 years: Daytime nap 1.45 hours ( 1 sleep) Night time sleep 12hrs ( no waking)

2.5 years – 3 years: Daytime nap 1-1.5hours ( 1 sleep)  Night time sleep 12hrs ( no waking)

 

PRE_SCHOOLERS – read a bedtime story in their bedroom every night. Bedroom should be quiet.

3 years -4years: Daytime nap maximum 45 mins  , Night time sleep 12 hours ( no waking)

4 years – 5 years: No Daytime nap , Night time sleep 12 hours ( no waking )

SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN 5-12 YEARS:

Children aged five to 12 need 10-11 hours of sleep. At the same time, there is an increasing demand on their time from school (e.g., homework), sports and other extracurricular and social activities. In addition, school-aged children become more interested in TV, computers, the media and Internet as well as caffeine products – all of which can lead to difficulty falling asleep, nightmares and disruptions to their sleep. In particular, watching TV close to bedtime has been associated with bedtime resistance, difficulty falling asleep, anxiety around sleep and sleeping fewer hours.

Sleep problems and disorders are prevalent at this age. Poor or inadequate sleep can lead to mood swings, behavioral problems such as hyperactivity and cognitive problems that impact on their ability to learn in school.

SLEEP TIPS FOR SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN:

  • Teach school age children about healthy sleep habits.
  • Continue to emphasize need for regular and consistent sleep schedule and bedtime routine.
  • Make child’s bedroom conducive to sleep – dark, cool and quiet.
  • Keep TV and computers out of the bedroom.
  • Avoid caffeine.